Future Exhibitions

Fall 2015

Documenting Inequality: Campus Conversations on Undergraduate Education

December 3 through 12, 2015
Lower Level | Classroom Studio B (formerly CRL Gallery)

This exhibition will present the final projects of students in Documenting Inequality, a course that emerged out of the University of Illinois Campus Conversation on Undergrduate Education initiative to pilot Grand Challenge Learning tracks on the topics of Sustainability, Energy, and the Environment; Health and Wellness; and Social Inequality and Cultural Understanding.

Taught by Terri Weissman, Associate Professor of Art History in the School of Art + Design, the class specifically examines how documentary and community-based art addresses economic and social inequality among children and young people in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the ways art can enhance understanding of lived and historical experiences of inequality beyond the limits of journalistic or scholarly accounts that inform our day-to-day understanding.

Spring 2016

Time / Image

Main Level | East Gallery
Curated by Amy L. Powell

Time / Image explores the deep relationship among cinema, time, and thought in contemporary art. The selected artists address time as an expansive dimension for interrogating the chronologies that govern how we live, for revisiting historical narratives and inherited genealogies, and for proposing futures yet to exist. They each seek out and develop temporal strategies of representation, whether in cinematic images that animate the past and revive ghostly residues, in montage and other creative juxtapositions that posit trans-historical and formal alignments, or in their close attention to mediums capable of representing time, including cinema and video but also photography, sculpture, and painting. The exhibition’s title and loose philosophical framework refer to Gilles Deleuze’s texts on cinema, which he argued shaped time as a tangible and active force in the world, capable of being reordered and reimagined.

Time / Image features works by Siemon Allen, Matthew Buckingham, Allan deSouza, Andrea Geyer, Leslie Hewitt, Isaac Julien, Lorraine O’Grady, Trevor Paglen, Raqs Media Collective, Ruth Robbins, and Gary Simmons.

An accompanying screening program will survey critical temporal interventions in film and video, featuring titles by John Akomfrah, Black Audio Film Collective, Robert Bresson, Cecilia Dougherty, Andrea Geyer, Djibril Diop Mambéty, Chris Marker, The Otolith Group, Raoul Peck, Semiconductor (Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt), Hito Steyerl, Clarissa Tossin, and Apichatpong Weerasethakul.

Time / Image is organized by the Blaffer Art Museum at the University of Houston and is partially supported by the Illinois Arts Council Agency, the Frances P. Rohlen Visiting Artists Fund/ College of Fine + Applied Arts, and Krannert Art Museum.

Collage: Moving Beyond Paper

Main Level | Rosann Gelvin Noel Gallery
Curated by Kathryn Koca Polite

This installation of works from the museum’s permanent collection will focus on the technique of collage. Whereas collage traditionally incorporates the act of cutting, gluing, and reassembling images together on paper or canvas, this exhibition will explore issues of materiality as artists further experiment with the method of collage and three-dimensional assemblage. Exhibing artists may include Don Baum, Victor Ekpuk, Nancy Grossman, Robert Motherwell, Frank Stella, and Allen Stringfellow.

Collecting Photography

Main Level | Contemporary Gallery
Curated by Kathryn Koca Polite

Krannert Art Museum actively acquires artworks every year to develop its permanent collection. This exhibition focuses on the museum's recent aquisitions of photography, highlighting the way modern and contemporary artists interpret the medium as they experiment with new technologies and photographic techniques. Exhibiting artists may include Zhao Bandi, Harold Edgerton, Donna Ferrato, Sam Jury, Susan Rankaitis, Tamen, Andy Warhol, and William Wegman.

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Krannert Art Museum
Photo by Kathryn Koca Polite